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Posts Tagged ‘Dwyane Wade’

Missed travels from Game 3 & 4 of Bulls-Heat series

May 26th, 2011 7 comments

You may recall how we haven’t covered yet most of the missed travels from Games 3 & 4 of the Chicago-Miami series simply because there were so many of them, there’s not enough time to include them in each game’s video summary before needing to move on to the next game.

However, we’ve decided to feature those missed travels in a separate video, which is below. As you can imagine, it’s very time-consuming to break them down in slow-motion (about 3-4 times longer), but it’s essential to prove the point.

We’ll work on the final game of the Dallas-OKC series next, but wanted to get this video out first before Game 5 of tonight’s Bulls-Heat game. We also imagine there are lots of Dallas fans who are interested in seeing what their next opponent does from a traveling perspective that the refs don’t call.

Here’s a summary of the travels in the video above (7 in Game 3, 10 in Game 4):

LeBron James – 6
Derrick Rose – 6
Dwyane Wade – 2
Chris Bosh – 2
Joakim Noah – 1

Game 3:

  • 0:07 – Miami’s LeBron James
  • 0:26 – Chicago’s Joakim Noah
  • 0:59 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose
  • 2:15 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose
  • 2:35 – Miami’s Chris Bosh
  • 3:17 – Miami’s LeBron James
  • 3:46 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose

Game 4

  • 4:20 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose (includes a wrong foul call by ref Bennett Salvatore on Miami’s Mario Chalmers
  • 5:53 – Miami’s Dwyane Wade
  • 6:20 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose
  • 7:05 – Miami’s LeBron James
  • 7:57 – Miami’s LeBron James
  • 8:22 – Miami’s Dwyane Wade
  • 8:49 – Chicago’s Derrick Rose
  • 9:11 – Miami’s Chris Bosh
  • 9:41 – Miami’s LeBron James
  • 10:14 – Miami’s LeBron James

Note: we cut down the number we originally had (20+) to 17 of the more obvious travels.

Bulls-Heat (Game 4): Select ref calls & no-calls, sans all the missed travels (coming later)

May 25th, 2011 9 comments

Below are select ref calls and no-calls from last night’s game between Chicago and Miami. We’ve also included a couple of calls that were really tough that the refs correctly made, to their credit.

We are planning on releasing a video before Game 5 (hopefully) of all the more obvious travels (20+) that have been missed by the refs in Games 3 & 4 of this series. When you have players like LeBron James, Dwyane Wade, and Derrick Rose playing in the same game, it adds a significant amount of time to create these videos if you want to cover all of the travels fairly (and show how bad the league and refs are in enforcing them).

So we’ve decided to try to tackle that feat through a separate project coming up soon. However, the final clip in THIS video DOES include one of the most important missed travels of the game — the shot made by LeBron James that put the game away for Miami.

In the video above, you’ll see the following clips:

  • Ref Joe Crawford will call a foul on Miami’s Joel Anthony when it didn’t look like he made contact with Chicago’s Derrick Rose.
  • Ref Ed Malloy will incorrectly call a charging foul on Chicago’s Luol Deng while Miami’s Chris Bosh was still moving laterally.
  • Ref Bennett Salvatore will incorrectly rule the ball went off Miami’s Chris Bosh‘s hand before going out of bounds when it really went off Chicago’s Taj Gibson‘s hand.
  • Ref Joe Crawford will correctly call an offensive foul against Chicago’s Luol Deng for leaning into Miami’s LeBron James.
  • Ref Joe Crawford will miss an obvious violation of Kyle Korver fouling an opponent when chasing after a loose ball, but fortunately ref Bennett Salvatore covered for Crawford’s omission and called the violation, probably thinking Crawford was going to call it, but when he didn’t, Salvatore had to blow his whistle late. Better late than never, though.
  • Two refs will call a shooting foul on Miami’s Dwayne Wade when it appears he didn’t make contact with Chicago’s Luol Deng wrist or arm.
  • Ref Ed Malloy made the correct call when Chicago’s Joakim Noah charged into Miami’s Udonis Haslem, and having to do it while ref Joe Crawford was calling an incorrect blocking foul on Haslem, which fortunately Malloy overruled.
  • Ref Bennett Salvatore will correctly call a foul on Miami’s LeBron James for charging into Chicago’s Ronnie Brewer.
  • Ref Joe Crawford will call a foul on Miami’s Dwyane Wade when it appeared he did nothing wrong with Chicago’s Luol Deng when Deng lost control of the ball on his own.
  • The refs will miss an obvious traveling call by Miami’s LeBron James as he hits a jumper that puts the game away and secures a victory.

Bulls-Heat (Game 3): So many calls, and so little time to capture them all

May 23rd, 2011 5 comments

There were so many calls and no-calls to review from last night’s Chicago-Miami game, it took longer than normal to go through them all. For example, we counted at least 10 travels that were missed by the refs (due to frequent violators like Derrick Rose, LeBron James and Dwayne Wade playing in the same game), but because it takes so much time to edit and include them in a video, we might create a separate video later that just focuses on those travels.

In the meantime, here are most of the non-traveling related calls and no-calls we found that were significant, or interesting.

In this video, you’ll see the following:

  • Ref Ron Garretson correctly calls back an inbounds pass from Dwyane Wade since the ball accidentally grazed Garretson’s fingers resulting in a turnover for the Heat. But Garretson should have called a foul on Taj Gibson for extending part of his body over the boundary line, which isn’t allowed according to the rulebook.
  • Ref Ron Garretson calls a ticky-tack foul on Chicago’s Carlos Boozer in defending Miami’s Chris Bosh.
  • Chicago’s Keith Bogans is fouled by Miami’s Dwayne Wade as Bogans goes into his shooting motion (which is the correct call), but Bogans arguably traveled, which was missed.
  • Chicago’s Carlos Boozer uses elbow to clear out space on Miami’s Udonis Haslem, but the refs didn’t call an offensive foul on Boozer.
  • Ref Steve Javie calls a foul on Chicago’s Ronnie Brewer when it looked like Miami’s Mario Chalmers was just jumping into the air to avoid colliding into his teammate, or was flopping. Wrong call by Javie.
  • Chicago’s Carlos Boozer seems to set an illegal screen on Miami’s Mike Miller, but no foul was called.
  • Miami’s Ronnie Brewer will fall hard on Miami’s Mike Miller in the scramble for a loose ball, but no foul is called.
  • Ref Mike Callahan will wrongly call an offensive charge against Chicago’s Carlos Boozer when he drives to the basket and contact is made with Miami’s Udonis Haslem, even though one of Haslem’s feet was in the restricted area.
  • Ref Ron Garretson calls a foul on Chicago’s Kyle Korver when it looks like Korver got “all ball” on a block of Miami’s LeBron James.
  • The refs will miss a shooting foul from Miami’s Mike Bibby on Chicago’s Joakim Noah.
  • Ref Steve Javie will correctly call an offensive foul on Chicago’s Luol Deng, but with the help of a sell/flop from Miami’s LeBron James.
  • Ref Ron Garretson will incorrectly call a moving screen on Chicago’s Joakim Noah when it appeared he was established before Miami’s Mike Bibby ran into him.
  • Ref Ron Garretson will call a ticky-tack foul on Miami’s Chris Bosh involving Chicago’s Carlos Boozer.

Heat-Bulls (Game 2): Plenty of calls to review from the 2nd half

May 19th, 2011 14 comments

There are plenty of calls to review from last night’s Miami-Chicago playoff game. There were so many, we just focused on select calls from the second half.

In the video above are the following clips:

  • Ref Monty McCutchen calls a phantom foul on Carlos Boozer involving LeBron James, when McCutchen had a worse angle on the play than the ref who was right next to the play and didn’t call anything!
  • Ref Monty McCutchen makes the correct out-of-bounds call off Derrick Rose while idiot fans viciously taunt him telling him he’s wrong.
  • Omar Asik does a nice sell/flop job to get a foul called against Mike Bibby
  • Omar Asik flops again to get a ticky-tack foul call from ref Monty McCutchen against Mike Miller
  • Ref Derrick Stafford incorrectly calls the ball off Dwyane Wade when it clearly went off Omar Asik
  • All three refs miss Taj Gibson holding on to the rim while the ball was in the cylinder. Should have been goaltending/basket interference
  • Ref Derrick Stafford correctly calls a travel on LeBron James, which is rare since many refs will miss this call

Heat-Celtics (Game 3): Refs not a problem, except for this one no-call hard to miss

May 8th, 2011 4 comments

We’ve been on a streak of good officiating where there hasn’t been any major blown calls that had a huge impact on the outcome of a game. After all, we’ve now got the “best” referees as graded by the league officiating the four series currently being played. We’ve also had games that haven’t been that close in the 3rd and 4th quarters, so the stakes haven’t been as high for a call or no-call to affect the outcome.

For Saturday’s games between Oklahoma City and Memphis, although it was a close game that went into overtime, there really wasn’t a bad ref call or no-call that could have changed the outcome. Same goes for Miami-Boston. We thought the play where Rajon Rondo fell to the floor with Dwyane Wade and dislocated his elbow was more of an accident where a no-call was the right call to make.

The only other call/no-call that stood out was in the 3rd quarter involving Ray Allen taking a shot, and obviously getting fouled by Wade, but there was no call.

Celtics-Heat (Game 2): Tough calls hard to judge at real speed examined

May 4th, 2011 4 comments

Last night’s Boston-Miami game had more consequential calls and no-calls than Memphis-Oklahoma City, which wasn’t as close until the end, so we’ll focus on some of the calls from that game that were difficult to assess at real speed.

The play that Dwyane Wade had with his “crossover” in front of Kevin Garnett for a bucket looked spectacular and got everyone excited in the crowd and on the bench. It almost looked too good to be true at the time, making you ask, “How did he do that?”

Well, we slowed down the tape, and like several calls we’ve examined, it was a travel based on how the rules are written (check out this piece for a thorough analysis on why we think plays like this are traveling — scroll down to section 1 in bold font). It makes sense since he went all the way from the “elbow” of the lane, faked out Garnett, and got to the rim. Is that really possible to do in just two steps? Our analysis shows that it isn’t if you follow the letter of the rule book.

We’ve also included a couple of other calls that were pretty difficult to assess at real speed.

Heat vs. 76ers (Game 1): Wade pushes off with leg on big basket and gets away with it

April 16th, 2011 No comments

A big no-call occurred in the Miami-76er game today. Miami was leading 90-87 with about 1:36 remaining when Dwyane Wade drove to the basket, went airborne, extended his leg to create separation between himself and Thaddeus Young, scored and Young was called for a foul.

What should have happened is that Wade should have been called for an offensive foul, with the 76ers getting the ball. But instead ref Bob Delaney (#26) blew the call, and the basket and penalty free throw basically sealed the win for the Heat.

The rulebook clearly states:

A player shall not hold, push, charge into, impede the progress of an opponent by extending a hand, arm, leg or knee or by bending the body into a position that is not normal. Contact that results in the re-routing of an opponent is a foul which must be called immediately.

In another part, it states:

An offensive foul shall be assessed if the player initiates contact in a non-basketball manner (leads with his foot, an unnatural extended knee, etc.).

You’ll hear analyst Jeff Van Gundy reference this fact somewhat, but he didn’t seem quite sure if using the leg to create separation is legal or not. At first he said it could “easily be construed” as a foul, then later compliments Wade for creating nice separation with his leg. Maybe he was being sarcastic on the second remark. Not only could it be construed as an offensive foul, it SHOULD be a foul based on the rulebook’s language.

It would have nice if fellow ref Sean Wright (#65), who also had a decent angle on the play, had come over to Delaney to correct him and let him know it was an offensive foul on Wade, then have the refs wave off the basket and the foul. But you’ll never see that happen on a play like this, especially when you have a legend like Delaney making a call like this in front a boisterous home crowd going crazy (in a good way) after the foul call.

What’s a shame is that Delaney did a good job NOT calling a foul right before Wade extended his leg when there was incidental contact between Wade and Young on Wade’s drive. We absolutely hate it when refs call ticky-tack fouls when contact is negligible, and the rulebook even states that refs have discretion in determining what’s incidental or not. So good for Delaney for not calling a foul on the incidental contact.

But when a player extends his leg to create separation, that goes too far. Too bad it had an effect on the outcome of Game 1 of what will be a very entertaining series.