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Archive for the ‘Charging’ Category

Thunder-Grizzlies (Game 6): Too many ticky-tack calls makes game almost unwatchable

May 14th, 2011 6 comments

Last night’s Oklahoma City-Memphis game was painful to watch from an officiating perspective, with lots of ticky-tack fouls called against both teams. Even the announcers mentioned how the game had no flow because of it.

If you’re a Grizzlies fan, fortunately you can say your team won without the benefit of bad ref calls against Oklahoma City. We documented most of the bad calls in the video below (with a breakdown in text below the video), and the bad calls seemed to go both ways, with ref Marc Davis being the worst ref of the bunch.

Here’s a breakdown of the calls/no-calls in the video, including some tough good calls where you have to give the refs credit.

  • An unnecessary charging call by ref Scott Foster (#48) on Kevin Durant
  • A good charging call from ref Scott Foster against Marc Gasol
  • A flop by Thabo Sefolosha. Good no-call by Scott Foster
  • A bad call from ref Marc Davis (#8) against James Harden that should have been let go
  • A good no-call from ref Ron Garretson (#10) when many refs would have called a charge or block
  • A bad charging call from Ron Garretson on Tony Allen. Should have been a block on James Harden
  • A ticky-tack foul from ref Marc Davis on Nick Collison involving a flop by Zach Randolph
  • A ticky-tack foul from ref Marc Davis on Shane Battier involving Russell Westbrook
  • A ticky-tack foul from ref Marc Davis on Kendrick Perkins involving Zach Randolph
  • A ticky-tack foul from ref Scott Foster on O.J. Mayo involving Russell Westbrook
  • A bad shooting foul from ref Scott Foster on Tony Allen involving Kevin Durant
  • A good call from ref Marc Davis on Darrell Arthur for charging into Nick Collison
  • A good call from ref Scott Foster on Zach Randolph for fouling Kendrick Perkins

Bulls-Hawks (Game 6): Bad game overall, but at least a few calls to feature

May 13th, 2011 2 comments

If you watched the Chicago-Atlanta game last night, which eliminated the Hawks from the playoffs, it wasn’t that great of a game to watch since Chicago seemed to have it in the bag most of the game. We had a hard time finding any calls worth mentioning, but found a couple, which include:

– A walk by Joakim Noah that happens right in front of the refs in near slow-motion, and no ref catches it
– A block by Zaza Pachulia on Derrick Rose that the ref Bob Delaney (#26) easily missed
– A flop from Keith Bogans that was so over-the-top, the ref must have blown off the contact because of such bad acting
– A hilarious flop from Omar Asik after a slight push from Pachulia

Hawks-Bulls (Game 5) – Roundup from Tuesday night’s game

May 11th, 2011 No comments

We’re back online and getting back into our groove, so in the video below are a few of the calls and no-calls that caught our attention from the Atlanta-Chicago game played Tuesday night, 5/10/11. We’ll be reviewing some of the calls from Wednesday night’s games in a few hours…

Bulls-Hawks (Game 4): Three tough calls/no-calls for Bulls fans

May 9th, 2011 2 comments

Here are three calls/no-calls from the Chicago-Atlanta game Sunday night that could have had a bearing on the outcome of the game. The Hawks won to even up the series 2-2.

Misconceptions about traveling & blocking rules need to be resolved by the league

April 30th, 2011 14 comments

Since launching RefCalls.com a couple of weeks ago, we have been encouraged by all the positive comments from readers who have been looking for a site like this one. That’s what we thought would happen before we launched, and it’s always good to have assumptions validated. There have been a few who have stated, “What’s the point?” But there are basketball diehards like us who really think that although it may be somewhat painful or grueling to discuss, it’s in the best interests of basketball.

We want to reiterate that we are not picking on the refs. We know how difficult a job it must be. But almost every industry has some kind of evaluation method for its professionals. For example, every part of an NBA player’s skill-set, physical abilities, ability to learn, etc., are evaluated and quantitatively measured. Doctors, lawyers, politicians, professors, you name it — all of them are evaluated, and thanks to the Internet, most of these evaluations are publicly available. So how come the refs aren’t, and are given a free pass by some people when they don’t have a problem with other professionals’ reputations available for online review?

We are very upfront that we will give refs credit when they make a tough call, or that they need the help of fellow refs, or replay, to make the right call. Some people have even thought we are giving refs too much credit.

Be that as it may, one thing that has surprised us reading comments on this site — as well as other sites that discuss some of the questionable calls/no-calls that we try to bring to everyone’s attention — is the amount of misinformation out there about the rules of the basketball.
Read more…

Mavericks-Blazers (Game 4): Questionable calls/no-calls analyzed from classic comeback game

April 24th, 2011 21 comments

Although there were some great playoff games played Saturday, the one between Portland and Dallas was incredible to watch, so we’re going to feature that one since it had some crucial ref calls and no-calls that could have had a bearing on the outcome. On Sunday we’ll feature a call or two from the Denver-Oklahoma City game.

The Indiana-Chicago game on Saturday was a close one, but surprisingly we didn’t see any controversial calls down the stretch that could have changed the outcome. Same goes for the San Antonio-Memphis game.

Rather than describe some of the Maverick-Blazer game calls through text, we’ll do it through the video below:

Magic-Hawks (Game 3): Zaza, J-Rich and Dwight get into it late, and refs get the fouls right

April 23rd, 2011 2 comments

Last night in Atlanta it got a little crazy down the stretch in the Magic-Hawks playoff game #3.

The most controversy occurred with 2:22 remaining in the 4th quarter when Zaza Pachulia (Atlanta), Jason Richardson and Dwight Howard (Orlando) were involved in an altercation, which led to Pachulia and Richardson getting ejected.

Just a few minutes earlier, Zaza had flopped to draw an offensive foul on Howard, which is the first clip in the video below. Then as you’ll see in the second clip, things got real chippy when Zaza came down hard on the arm of Howard, who retaliated, setting off a firestorm.

Mavericks-Blazers (Game 3): Three flops (“allegedly”) from one player in same game, & questionable call fouls out Chandler

April 23rd, 2011 3 comments

Except for one game, Friday’s playoff action didn’t really have any wrong calls or missed calls that would have changed the outcome because they weren’t very close games (Celtics-Knicks, Lakers-Hornets). We’ll be providing a couple of clips shortly of some fouls from the Atlanta-Orlando game that were noteworthy in a very close game, though.

In the meantime, we wanted to feature some calls and flops from the Portland-Dallas game Thursday night. Both teams will be playing again on Saturday at 5pm ET.

Three of the clips involve J.J. Barea allegedly flopping (you be the judge), and one features a loose ball foul called on Tyson Chandler that was questionable at best. It fouled him out of the game with Dallas still having a chance to make a run, down only 10 points in the 4th quarter with plenty of time still left to play.

Grizzlies-Spurs (Game 2): Was this a charge or block? Plus, a good no-call on major flop

April 21st, 2011 5 comments

For a game that was relatively close Wednesday night between San Antonio and Memphis, fortunately we didn’t see any terrible calls down the stretch that would have changed the outcome of the game.

However, we did want to feature one foul in the 3rd quarter that we thought was very questionable. Check it out in the video below and see if you agree with referee Leon Wood (#40). We know many of you will say there were many more questionable calls than this, but we have to pick-and-choose one of the best, okay?

In the second clip, we feature an Oscar-winning performance by Memphis forward Shane Battier, which the refs correctly called as a no-call.

While checking these clips out, also listen to the overflowing remarks about Manu Ginobili from Spurs’ broadcasters Bill Land and former player Sean Elliott. It was drooling remarks like these the whole game that prompted ESPN.com’s Bill Simmons to tweet what’s posted below the video player. (We just had to throw it in there).

Bill Simmons’ tweets about the Spurs’ announcers 4/20/11

Nuggets-Thunder (Game 2): No ref controversy, but examples of one bad call and a good one

April 21st, 2011 6 comments

In Wednesday’s first playoff game, Oklahoma City easily handled Denver 106-89. So there weren’t that many important calls that were blown that could have changed the outcome of the game. However, we did want to feature a couple of intriguing calls in the video below.

The first one has Denver’s J.R. Smith driving the lane, getting hacked on the arm, but no call being made by the closest ref to the action, Rodney Mott (#71). Through our watching lots of video of ref calls, for some reason most ref crews subconsciously put the responsibility of making a call like this on the ref closet to the play along the baseline, although any ref can call it. It just goes to show there’s some human psychology involved when other refs are reluctant to call a foul and “show up” another ref that is closer to the action, in our opinion.

The second play in the video shows Russell Westbrook pushing off in mid-air. We’ve seen this kind of call get missed alot (it is a difficult one to make at times), but Monty McCutchen (#13) got it right, and he’s farther away from the play than Mott is. Analyst Mike Fratello states that two officials got it right, but we slowed the video down and it was McCutchen who blew his whistle first. Perhaps after the first play that Mott missed, McCutchen took it upon himself to make the call on this play regardless of where he was situated.

From our observations, we see countless times where one ref will signal a violation in reaction to a fellow ref who has already done it order to provide support. We don’t have a problem with that, but Fratello’s claim that both refs got it right is a difficult one to prove, and is therefore irrelevant.