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Bulls-Hawks (Game 4): Three tough calls/no-calls for Bulls fans

May 9th, 2011 2 comments

Here are three calls/no-calls from the Chicago-Atlanta game Sunday night that could have had a bearing on the outcome of the game. The Hawks won to even up the series 2-2.

Misconceptions about traveling & blocking rules need to be resolved by the league

April 30th, 2011 14 comments

Since launching RefCalls.com a couple of weeks ago, we have been encouraged by all the positive comments from readers who have been looking for a site like this one. That’s what we thought would happen before we launched, and it’s always good to have assumptions validated. There have been a few who have stated, “What’s the point?” But there are basketball diehards like us who really think that although it may be somewhat painful or grueling to discuss, it’s in the best interests of basketball.

We want to reiterate that we are not picking on the refs. We know how difficult a job it must be. But almost every industry has some kind of evaluation method for its professionals. For example, every part of an NBA player’s skill-set, physical abilities, ability to learn, etc., are evaluated and quantitatively measured. Doctors, lawyers, politicians, professors, you name it — all of them are evaluated, and thanks to the Internet, most of these evaluations are publicly available. So how come the refs aren’t, and are given a free pass by some people when they don’t have a problem with other professionals’ reputations available for online review?

We are very upfront that we will give refs credit when they make a tough call, or that they need the help of fellow refs, or replay, to make the right call. Some people have even thought we are giving refs too much credit.

Be that as it may, one thing that has surprised us reading comments on this site — as well as other sites that discuss some of the questionable calls/no-calls that we try to bring to everyone’s attention — is the amount of misinformation out there about the rules of the basketball.
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Mavericks-Blazers (Game 4): Questionable calls/no-calls analyzed from classic comeback game

April 24th, 2011 21 comments

Although there were some great playoff games played Saturday, the one between Portland and Dallas was incredible to watch, so we’re going to feature that one since it had some crucial ref calls and no-calls that could have had a bearing on the outcome. On Sunday we’ll feature a call or two from the Denver-Oklahoma City game.

The Indiana-Chicago game on Saturday was a close one, but surprisingly we didn’t see any controversial calls down the stretch that could have changed the outcome. Same goes for the San Antonio-Memphis game.

Rather than describe some of the Maverick-Blazer game calls through text, we’ll do it through the video below:

Mavericks-Blazers (Game 3): Three flops (“allegedly”) from one player in same game, & questionable call fouls out Chandler

April 23rd, 2011 3 comments

Except for one game, Friday’s playoff action didn’t really have any wrong calls or missed calls that would have changed the outcome because they weren’t very close games (Celtics-Knicks, Lakers-Hornets). We’ll be providing a couple of clips shortly of some fouls from the Atlanta-Orlando game that were noteworthy in a very close game, though.

In the meantime, we wanted to feature some calls and flops from the Portland-Dallas game Thursday night. Both teams will be playing again on Saturday at 5pm ET.

Three of the clips involve J.J. Barea allegedly flopping (you be the judge), and one features a loose ball foul called on Tyson Chandler that was questionable at best. It fouled him out of the game with Dallas still having a chance to make a run, down only 10 points in the 4th quarter with plenty of time still left to play.

Grizzlies-Spurs (Game 2): Was this a charge or block? Plus, a good no-call on major flop

April 21st, 2011 5 comments

For a game that was relatively close Wednesday night between San Antonio and Memphis, fortunately we didn’t see any terrible calls down the stretch that would have changed the outcome of the game.

However, we did want to feature one foul in the 3rd quarter that we thought was very questionable. Check it out in the video below and see if you agree with referee Leon Wood (#40). We know many of you will say there were many more questionable calls than this, but we have to pick-and-choose one of the best, okay?

In the second clip, we feature an Oscar-winning performance by Memphis forward Shane Battier, which the refs correctly called as a no-call.

While checking these clips out, also listen to the overflowing remarks about Manu Ginobili from Spurs’ broadcasters Bill Land and former player Sean Elliott. It was drooling remarks like these the whole game that prompted ESPN.com’s Bill Simmons to tweet what’s posted below the video player. (We just had to throw it in there).

Bill Simmons’ tweets about the Spurs’ announcers 4/20/11

Hornets vs. Lakers (Game 1): Good call by ref deserves credit on a tough play during big possession

April 18th, 2011 4 comments

In New Orleans’ 109-100 victory over the Lakers on Sunday, there was really only one controversial call late in the game worth mentioning, and it was the correct call.

When we first saw the play, we thought the ref call was wrong because we were focusing on the contact that Chris Paul was applying on Derek Fisher‘s back, which is the most obvious contact in the play. On the replay from the floor camera angle, you’ll see Fisher has his leg extended in front of Paul while Paul is standing still, which is legal.

Analyst Jeff Van Gundy asks if Fisher was in a “legal guarding position,” which he was. But Van Gundy goes on to say Fisher “didn’t move.” However, if you slow down the replay enough times (which we have done for you in the video), you will see that Fisher moved his left knee upwards, almost into Paul’s groin, along with his left heel rising off the floor, revealing that his thigh is moving slyly upwards. This explains why referee Greg Willard (#53) called a block on Fisher.

Paul was pretty smart on this play because he saw how Fisher was positioned with his leg in his path, and decided to drive through Fisher’s leg. Paul might have been called for a charge if Fisher hadn’t raised his leg upwards, which Willard caught. Paul also sold the contact well by contorting his body and letting go of the ball like he had been jolted harder than he really was.