Home > Chicago Bulls, Indiana Pacers, Missed travels > Bulls-Pacers (Game 3): A huge no-call on a travel helps Bulls win, but can you totally blame the refs?

Bulls-Pacers (Game 3): A huge no-call on a travel helps Bulls win, but can you totally blame the refs?

In picking the top play to analyze from the Bulls-Pacers game, there is none bigger than the game-winning drive and shot made by Derrick Rose with 18 seconds remaining with the game tied 84-84.

It was very similar to Rose’s drive in Game 1 on Saturday when we analyzed a similar drive to the basket that led to a big bucket leading to a Bulls win. Although that drive was arguably a missed travel, there’s no question Rose’s drive on Thursday night was a travel. [Bulls fans, don’t bother to comment that we’re being “biased.” We reiterate that we can’t possibly cover all the wrong calls in a game, or even a fraction, since there’s way too many. So we’re not bashing particular players — we’re holding the REFs accountable for making the right call.]

It’s clear in the video above that what looked like a “jump stop” (not a rulebook term) in regular speed, when slowed down, were two different steps. The rulebook states that both feet have to land “simultaneously” (which IS the word they use in the rulebook). When you slow it down, it was a travel that was missed (although TV announcers still never seem to bring it up as a possibility right after it happens).

But when you think of it, is it even humanly possible for refs and announcers to catch this kind of violation 100% of the time at regular speed when a fast player like Rose does it?

As we explain in our video on missed travels at RefCalls.com/missed-travels, we don’t think missed travels should continue to be ignored if the league wants to improve the integrity of the game. And as we’ve seen from the response to RefCalls.com since we launched, there is a large number of fans who want something to be done to improve enforcement of the rules because it’s currently a turn-off for many of them.

What would you propose be done to resolve this problem: more training (would that even work?), or instant replay review in the last two minutes like they do with other potential violations? If you have ideas, please provide your comments.

  • Sam

    Your “step one” is not step 1 because he does not have the ball in his hand, it is still in flight. Until a step is taken with possession, the count doesn’t start. Watch the ball again when you put step 1. Step 2 is actually step 1.

    As for the carry, may be or may not be, however slowing it down (as with any carry, Rose or not) is deceptive because your perception will be somewhat affected by the amount of time it sees him holding the ball.

    • Brent

      He clearly has the ball in his hand during step one, so it has to count.

      • Staff

        Right on, Brent!

      • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

        Right on, Brent. If Sam would look at the Twitter box on the right side of this page, there’s also a guy in there who tweeted the following this morning:

        “Couldn’t believe how obvious that Rose travel was and NOBODY commented on it. I saw a replay 20 times and there was no doubt!!”

        • Sam

          Yes, because when something is memorialized in a tweet that makes it fact. Just watched it 3 more times. Step 1 is Step 0.

      • Jay

        The dribbling doesnt end until he either A. puts his hand underneath the ball or B. Touches it with a second hand. If he still is using 1 hand and it is on top of the ball, the dribbling still continues and it doesnt count as his first step. This isnt a travel.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_J3PKQX2KA6CO4F2SA3O6YH4GXY Brian Fantana

    This is what you pick to complain about ref calls from this game? Not the Jeff Foster “Flagrant foul” for elbowing Deng in the back of the end, when Deng got him in the air on a pump fake. Not McRoberts wrapping up Rose with both arms on a fastbreak, which was called a jump ball? I agree this was a very poorly officiated game all around.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Yeah, that’s right. That’s about as big of a ref miss as you can get, although we explain in the post and the video it’s a tough one to detect, and that’s part of the problem the league needs to address.

      We knew the Foster one was big (and it wasn’t Deng he elbowed, it was Rose at the 5:59 mark of the 3rd quarter), but not as big as Rose’s because it determined the outcome of the game. And we knew ESPN and all the national media was going to be talking about this play today and beyond. That one is an easy one. We like to expose the ones that aren’t so obvious so that people, TV announcers, and maybe the league will understand the not-so-obvious ones. And we are saying over and over again that there is not enough time to feature every call — there’s too many of them.

      Heck, even in this post, we make it abundantly clear, but some people aren’t getting it. Here’s what we wrote:

      “We reiterate that we can’t possibly cover all the wrong calls in a game, or even a fraction, since there’s way too many. So we’re not bashing particular players — we’re holding the REFs accountable for making the right call.”

      Thanks for commenting, though.

  • Anonymous

    It’s not a travel because you can’t consider Step 2 and Step 3 as separate. If you notice, he gets up in the air before he picks up his foot from your “Step 2.” So it is not a travel as long as you take a step (Step 1) and then go off both feet, like Rose did there. Jumping off both feet gives you more power and better finishing ability. It’s exactly how we teach that move every day in the gym.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Huh? That’s the first time we’ve heard someone try to say if you jump in the air after a step, then the next step after the jump isn’t really a step. So I could just jump down the court after a step the whole way and not be called for a dribble? Wow, once all coaches let the players know this, they will change the name to “pogo-ball.” Just ribbin’ you a bit.

      Clearly the NBA rules prohibit what you’re saying, and that’s what we’re here for — to clear up misconceptions. You can download the rulebook here: http://www.nba.com/officiating/ and look at Section XIII — Traveling on page 37, and there is nothing on there about if you jump in the air after landing with Steps 2 and 3, that those steps are okay. As we point out in the post, both feet have to land simultaneously, which they don’t.

      • Anonymous

        You’re not really jumping in the air after that first step. Since you get one and a half steps, that first one is the 1, and then you jump off both feet is the 1/2 step. In the year 2011, this has become completely accepted. Now, had he only jumped off one foot, it would’ve been a travel since that becomes 2 1/2 steps. I’m as old school as they come, but you’ve gotta teach what the referees will allow. If you go to any program, you’ll see this footwork taught.

        • Steve

          This is exactly right.

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Point out in the rulebook, page and section number, where what you agreed to is true:

            “Since you get one and a half steps, that first one is the 1, and then you jump off both feet is the 1/2 step. In the year 2011, this has become completely accepted. Now, had he only jumped off one foot, it would’ve been a travel since that becomes 2 1/2 steps.”

            You can download it at http://nba.com/officiating — We’ll be waiting.

          • Anonymous

            Hey, if you want to get into the minutiae of the wording of the NBA travel call, I can’t stop you. This is the NBA – the strict leter of the traveling rule never got in the way of Robert Parrish, Moses Malone, Michael Jordan. As the game has evolved, so too has the interpretation of the rules. And whether you want to accept it or not, the bottom line is a step and then jump off both feet at the same time is now allowed, and taught. And there is no Santa Claus either. (NowI’m ribbin’ you a bit :)

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Without a rulebook, your “interpretation” of the rules can be completely different from the next guy, to the next guy, to the next guy. Then you have chaos. That’s why there are standards.

            We knew us referring you to the rulebook would stump you. It stumps most people because who don’t have the patience to go through the “minutae” as you say it, and just believe the all-knowing announcers who don’t know what the hell they are talking about alot of times. There are some good ones, but most of them are too busy playing golf during the day, and mailing it in when they show up for a broadcast without ever picking up a rulebook.

            It’s much worse now than it was back in the 80s. Every basketball expert will tell you that.

            You know, since you wrote us, our interpretation of the rules has suddenly evolved to where we now think goaltending allows a player to swipe it off the rim, or that a defender can give a forearm to the chest of a shooter because that’s how we think the game should now be played. Damn refs, they’re just getting in the way of how we think the game should be played. So they should let us do anything we want because that’s our intepretation In fact, let’s just take the refs off the court and let the game evolve naturally. I like the idea of basketball becoming more like “rollerball.”

            Regarding the players who are allowed to jump with both feet. Wow, we didn’t know that “is now allowed” We thought when players jump, they could only do it using one leg. I guess all those years when players were taking jump shots after completing their dribble, they were in violation because they weren’t jumping into the air with one leg. Time to erase all those points thousands of NBA players have scored through the decades because they were completely in violation according to what you’re saying until it was recently “allowed.” (rib-rib). ;-)

          • Anonymous

            I love you. I guarantee you will love me if you watch what we do at http://bballbreakdown.com

          • Anonymous

            And Steve, I love this conversation – the passion, the adjectives. This is great, and I’m glad I found refcalls.com – hope you are too.
            I think you’ll love our channel at http://bballbreakdown.com since it’s in the same vein – check it out.
            Coach Nick

          • Steve

            I like anything that separates fact from fiction and clears up the myths and legends for the casual NBA fans. Guys like you and Sebastian Pruiti are a boon to the Internet community of basketball journalists/bloggers specifically because you sort through the fluff and tell it how it actually is. Hopefully refcalls.com follows the same path.

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Great site! We can appreciate how much work it is to edit video, write the copy, do a clean voiceover, and to do it all before the next day’s games.

          • Anonymous

            Thanks guys! Let me know if you want to do some reciprocal shout outs or something. Lots of overlap in terms of visitor interest, I’m sure. coachNick@bballbreakdown.com

        • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

          Point out in the rulebook, page and section number, where what you state below is true:

          “Since you get one and a half steps, that first one is the 1, and then you jump off both feet is the 1/2 step. In the year 2011, this has become completely accepted. Now, had he only jumped off one foot, it would’ve been a travel since that becomes 2 1/2 steps.”

          You can download it at http://nba.com/officiating — We’ll be waiting.

  • Yesoo

    It’s clearly not a jump stop. However, it is not a travel. His dribble doesn’t truly end before your step one. It’s clearer from camera angle behind the basket. His right foot is clearly down and he is still in the act of dribbling. His second hand doesn’t touch the ball till both feet are off the ground. If the dribble ends while both feet are off the ground, the player may still establish a pivot foot.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Check out this piece (http://refcalls.com/missed-travels) where we go into detail on the problems with the current language in the rulebook of the “act of dribbling,” or “completion of a dribble” (how the rulebook words it) and how some people will say this is just “the gather” (even former refs) where we state that word is not even in the rulebook — just “completion of a dribble,” which is ambiguous and vague.

      The completion of a dribble should be when it touches a player hand after it comes back from the floor since players can do all kinds of stuff with their hands and wrists to buy time to make it look like they are completing their dribble. That’s what many players have been doing over the years, and the refs aren’t calling it because the league likes it when smaller, quick guys can get to the rim and score on spectacular, diving shots like Rose did (these kinds of plays rarely happened before the ’90s — you just don’t see it in old footage from the 70’s or 80’s — and it’s not because the players weren’t as athletic then — they are just getting away with more after pushing the envelope).

      Since no one is calling them out on it, they will continue to do it. That’s why we’re here: to raise the question is this what we really want? And if so, then change the rulebook language to allow it. The problem with that is diehard basketball enthusiasts will say this isn’t what Dr. Naismith (or whoever came up with the current rulebook) intended, and a big debate would ensue, which would be healthy. It would be akin to changing language in the Constitution through an Amendment: it can be done, but there would be alot of healthy discussion about it.

  • UhateKobe

    you guys are such kobe haters, look at the way you comment the play that kobe made that was exactly the same as this one….rose is just “too quick” for refs but kobe is just dirty…..its not a travel, neither of them

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Haha — point out where we use the word “dirty.” Kobe is obviously one of the quick guys, so is Carmelo, CP3, and just about every other guard and small forward in the league. Obviously, we don’t have the time or space to list everyone. So because we don’t list Kobe, then we’re automatically Kobe haters. Gotcha. Then we’re Carmelo haters, CP3 haters, etc. Please.

  • Pessimism

    This is a clear travel. But it’s distressing to see that the fans are even more of a problem than even I give them credit for being. People who watch basketball nowadays are quick on the trigger to explain away such gross violations of the rules. It is true that this kind of play can’t be caught every time:

    “But when you think of it, is it even humanly possible for refs and announcers to catch this kind of violation 100% of the time at regular speed when a fast player like Rose does it?”

    Probably not 100% of the time (although this particular play was obvious). But something must be done. As evidenced by some of the absurd comments here in the first month, audiences are now conditioned to accept traveling. This comment by what appears to be a coach is saddening:

    “So it is not a travel as long as you take a step (Step 1) and then go off both feet, like Rose did there. Jumping off both feet gives you more power and better finishing ability. It’s exactly how we teach that move every day in the gym.” [+ some other nonsense about Step 2 and 3 being separate].

    Awful, dead wrong, and an example of everything wrong with basketball today. It’s true that jumping off two feet provides more power and better finishing ability. That’s why it’s such a luxury to be able to cheat it into a three-step travel move. It’s done because it’s effective. But it’s illegal. Change the rules or play by them.

    With Derrick Rose in the spotlight, and audiences trying to reproduce his moves in their own pickup games, this problem is only going to get worse.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Very well said! You have captured exactly what we’ve been thinking since launching this site, reading comments from visitors, and comments on other forums where people are talking about our content. It’s good to know at least that there are some people out there like yourself who believe the same as we do: “Change the rules or play by them,” although if they change the rules, I’m sure there would be lots of discussion about the records from the past could be irrelevant (they probably already are), kind of like if the league expanded from 48 minutes per game to 54, or if baseball allowed steroids in the game. All those records that were broken in the Bonds and McGwire era are kind of looked like as a joke. I think the same could be said for this era where the rules in the NBA have not been followed, and probably shouldn’t because Dr. Naismith would be rolling over in his grave, and some purists of the game will defend rule changes vociferously.

  • Bnospam

    This is not a travel…It’s the European two-step. The gather step doesn’t count as your first step. Ginobli does this all the time as does Carmelo Anthony as does Lebron James. There’s a reason it wasn’t called and there’s not a huge amount of people clamoring for it to be called (a la Kendrick Perkins basket interference call)

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      So if someone you think is right jumps off a bridge, then we guess you will follow without looking it up to see that could kill you. Good luck with that.

  • Steve

    First off, this isn’t a travel by NBA standards.

    Second off, even if it was, if you’re going to post video breakdowns of every missed traveling call, or instance of palming, then this site is going to get awfully old awfully fast. What’s next? The dozens of non-calls on 3-second violations every game? Free throw lane violations? Guys forgetting to tuck in their uniforms?

    If a ref makes a call and it’s clearly wrong then that’s certainly worth posting about. However, pointing out non-calls is a gigantic waste of time unless those non-calls are unbelievably egregious: i.e. a guy getting elbowed in the face; offensive interference on a game winner; smacked on the arm during a three to tie it up; etc.

    Focus on big stuff or you’re going to lose whatever audience you have very quickly. If you feel compelled to write about the incidental rule violations like minor palming or slight traveling then maybe save it for a weekly wrap-up or only for Twitter posts.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      You just don’t get it, so we’re not going to waste our time responding.

      • Steve

        I thought I was helping you find your focus to help make this a successful site. Guess not.

        • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

          Maybe you should read all of the places about what our philosophy is (starting with the obvious “About” link at the top of the page) before you provide your advice. It doesn’t make you look very smart that you didn’t do your due diligence. WE SAY UPFRONT ALL OVER THE PLACE WE ARE NOT GOING TO POST EVERY MISSED TRAVELING CALL and all the small stuff. And we say we are going to give refs credit where credit is due. And we aren’t trying to be ESPN focusing on the “big stuff.” ESPN, NBA.com, Yahoo Sports, etc. — that’s where people go looking for the “big stuff,” and you want us to compete with that? That sounds really smart. Instead, we are focusing on the stuff that people typically miss that has a long-term impact on the integrity of the game. Thanks for the advice, “steve@yahoo.com” (yeah, like that’s your real email address. Why are you trying to hide your real identity, BTW?).

          • Steve

            For what it’s worth, I work in the league as a scout, and while I find the refereeing in the NBA to be infuriating and possibly suspect, I would rather not have this associated directly with me as it can potentially impact my work. With that said, and despite our disagreements, I fully support what you’re doing here, even if I don’t necessarily agree with your conclusions or focus, and I hope that over time you will become better at this and hopefully create an authority destination for fans that looks at the officiating situation in the NBA objectively.

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Thanks. The presentation of that viewpoint was much better. We’re kind of like David vs. Goliath (the NBA), so we’re needing to expend lots of energy just creating our content each night for no money as we try to build awareness of this problem that many people gloss over or doesn’t even know exists (that’s how basketball illiterate our society has become). That’s why we can get a little terse if people come across all-knowing when they wouldn’t bother to go through the enormous amount of work to try to solve this problem pulling all-nighters each night trying to post just two posts (video editing is very time consuming). Thanks again, and we look forward to your continue visits. Spread the word, too!

          • Steve

            I wish you luck, it’s obviously a ton of work, but certainly a noble idea!

  • Ctoney08

    I wouldn’t say it was a “clear” travel… Especially on Rose who uses the jump stop frequently on drives. I’ve seen him in person and he’s a blur man. That’s why the fouls on Foster looked so bad because Rose gets into the paint really, really fast. If he were running at an average speed, the foul would have just been a hard foul…

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Good stuff, unlike some of the comments we’ve been reading since launching. It definitely wasn’t clear because he is so fast, as are others. That’s why we posed the question what can be done about it to improve the quality of officiating given how fast these players are: replay, more training of refs, a ref in the booth looking at replay, etc?

  • Wekko368

    Doesn’t the 2 step count begin after the player gathers the ball? Look at the 43 second mark. As he’s gathering the ball, it gets stripped. He’s able to get control of it and then takes 2 steps.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      You can check out a detailed description of one of the most misunderstood rules by checking out http://RefCalls.com/missed-travels. It explains how the concept and word of “gathering” is not in the rulebook. But the short answer is that you can take 2 steps after you complete your dribble (which is vague and subjective) which we’ll be writing another piece on over the next few days. BTW: Rose wasn’t stripped. If he had been and he had taken only 2 steps after getting control of the ball, it would have been legal.

      • Anonymous

        Rose was stripped by George. Rose gathered the ball in his left hand, and George knocked it into his right hand. It happens at the 43 second mark in the clip.

        • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

          A “strip” means it’s knocked out of one’s hands and the player loses control of it, or fumbles it. Rose never lost control of it. He was switching from one hand to the other, kind of like what a running back does in football. And he can do anything he wants with the ball in his hands as long as he doesn’t take 3 steps while doing it. You musta meant it was “touched” by the other player. That it was, but that doesn’t mean you get to reset your “step counter.” If it had been knocked out of his hands and he lost control of it, then he could have resumed his dribble or taken two steps before having to dribble it again.

          • Anonymous

            If you don’t see it, I suggest watching a HD version of the play.

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Yeah, we have HD. It wasn’t stripped. It was touched.

          • Anonymous

            Ok, it was touched with such force that it jarred the ball loose. The ball was either stripped or Rose was fouled. Regardless of how you choose to interpret it, it wasn’t a traveling violation.

          • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

            Some people will never give up. Our volunteer ref is getting a hoot out of this one. Thanks for humoring him.

          • Anonymous

            Sorry, but you’re 100% wrong. George clearly knocks it out of Rose’s left hand. Like I said before, go watch the replay on HD. Its crystal clear.

  • dud

    Clearly a travelling, he did not land his feet simultaneously (with the jump step). But i don’t think he did it on purpose, or i hope so. lol

  • JumboJet

    To me this isn’t 3 steps. When you mark his second step, his other leg is already in position to land. Sure he didn’t land ‘simultaneously’ with both feet, but really unless you are landing with both legs completely rigid you are never going to land with both fee simultaneously. It may appear so, but if you zoom in close enough and slow it down enough, one foot will always land before another.

    Anyway, I still don’t understand your or other people’s hatred for some minor travel call when those seem to never be called against anyone anyway. Like baseball’s strike zone, as long as its applied fairly to both teams then who cares if it was actually over the plate or not?

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      You bring up some good points and actually echo one of the themes of our post: these guys are very fast and it’s almost impossible for the refs to see it live, as you see in the title of our post, “Can you totally blame the refs?” But the fact we can’t see it real speed doesn’t mean it didn’t happen, and you acknowledge that. That happens with replay all the time. Kind of like that adage, “If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around, did it make a sound?”

      We agree to disagree that “you are never going to land with both feet simultaneously.” We see tons of players who can do that. That’s why Rose’s attempt to do it and lack of success in doing it stood out to us.

      But we are sensing from all the positive comments this site has inspired that there may be just as many people who do want the rules enforced as written, or change the rules. If you don’t and let things go, the whole rulebook will become just “suggestions” and a joke.

      It sounds like your suggestion is to let it go, without any improved training of the refs, inserting of replay into the equation, etc., which we can respect. But then we guess the follow-up question is, “When is enough enough?”

      Thanks again for commenting above in a civil, professional manner, although it’s not “hatred” we have, but rather “concern.”

      • JumboJet

        After reading this post’s comments, I’d say you maybe have half the people here who are “concerned” with traveling with the rest of them accepting things like what happened above. Personally, I’d still rather see less video’s of the above (the Greg Maddux ball that’s ruled a strike even though it is 4″ off the plate) and more video’s like Wade’s karate kick or Kobe’s obvious hacking and then complaining. Those are things that aren’t as subjective and I feel the league needs to clean those up more than the 3 and a half steps that lead to sportscenter highlights

        • Staff

          That’s the plan we’ve stated — not to show all travels because there are so many of them, but only show when it helps determine the outcome of a game in a late-game situation like Rose’s, and those that are so egregious (like Kobe’s against New Orleans). When doing so, we’re not indicting the players (since players will normally do anything they can to get an advantage) as much as the refs who blow really easy travel calls (the Kobe example) or it’s clear they need help through the use of instant replay (like someone in the booth like the NFL has who can immediately review and communicate to the refs on the floor to reverse it, not going over to the scorers’ table to review it themselves). We do think the league needs to clean up traveling, too, because it’s the basic fundamental way players get from point A to point B, a huge factor. But for us to show every travel on this web site wouldn’t do much good, but just raising the topic that exists. You get it, which is great. But it seems like some people will fight to the death to say what players are doing in these cases is okay. Thanks for your comments.

        • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

          That’s the plan we’ve stated — not to show many travels because there are so many of them, but only show when it helps determine the outcome of a game in a late-game situation like Rose’s, and those that are so egregious (like Kobe’s against New Orleans). When doing so, we’re not indicting the players (since players will normally do anything they can to get an advantage) as much as the refs who blow really easy travel calls (the Kobe example) or it’s clear they need help through the use of instant replay (like someone in the booth like the NFL has who can immediately review and communicate to the refs on the floor to reverse it, not going over to the scorers’ table to review it themselves). We do think the league needs to clean up traveling, too, because it’s the basic fundamental way players get from point A to point B (like the basket), a huge factor in the game that deserves scrutiny. But for us to show every travel on this web site wouldn’t do much good, but raising the topic so a conversation can take place that might get the attention of others and ultimately the league might help. You get it, which is great. But it seems like some people will fight to the death to say what players are doing in these cases is okay. Thanks for your comments.

  • Mavsfan

    Rule 4 Section II- Dribble
    a) a dribble ends when the dribbler: 1) touches the ball with both hands 2)Permits the ball to come to rest while he is in control of it…
    then a few other things that don’t apply to this situation. At the time of the step you guys mark as step 1 Rose isn’t touching it with both hands and the ball is still moving and hasn’t come to rest even though Rose is touching it again. Therefore the dribble hasn’t ended and the 1st step isn’t the 1st step. While the term “gather” isn’t in the rule book the concept behind it is. The ball is not at rest while you “gather” it so the dribble hasn’t ended.
    Don’t get me wrong I fully support this site and the concept behind, heck I even dislike Rose and the Bulls, but on this one it would appear that this is not a travel.

    • RefCalls-TopFlops staff

      Thanks for the compliment and for your thorough research. We’re actually writing a piece now that gets into the “permits the ball to come to rest while he is in control of it” clause, so stay tuned for that post.

  • Hammer

    Which is why NBA would be so much better without having to dribble at all. You can just run with the ball like a football. Charging and blocking fouls still apply. Would revolutionize the game and get rid of all those missed calls.

  • Ben

    “A player who receives the ball while in progress or upon completing his dribble is allowed a one-two count after gathering the ball and preparing to stop, pass or shoot.”

    That is from NBA.com. You are defining “gather” to mean “touching”, thus making a travel where this is none. “Gather” is different than touching, and Rose has both his feet in the air before he has gathered the ball.

    • Staff

      NBA.com has references to several things that aren’t in the official NBA rulebook, leading to even more confusion. Who knows, maybe some intern wrote the stuff on NBA.com, so you have to refer to the ultimate source — the NBA rulebook you can download at http://nba.com/officiating . And we don’t define “gather” because the NBA rulebook doesn’t even have that word in it — it’s just some term that someone started using and for some reason has caught on without anything in the rulebook to back it up.. So we have to resort to the other words in the rulebook, which doesn’t even refer to this concept. They need to fix it.

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