Home > Boston Celtics, Missed travels, New York Knicks, Technical foul > Tuesday’s featured calls: Knicks-Celtics (Game 2) – couple of 4Q no-calls help Boston

Tuesday’s featured calls: Knicks-Celtics (Game 2) – couple of 4Q no-calls help Boston

All three of the playoff games Tuesday night had their fair share of bad calls and no-calls. But as we’re sure you can understand, we can’t try to tackle all of the bad calls and good calls in a game. There are just too many.

What we do try to focus on are those close games where there were some pivotal calls in the 4th quarter that could have changed the outcome of the game.

It’s not ideal, but we think over time as we evaluate more cases like these, we’ll have so many of them that it will might bring more attention to the breadth of the problem, and fans will become more educated about them. Then perhaps the powers-that-be will do something to address them.

Among Tuesday’s games, the best game to select was the Knicks-Celtics game because it went down to the wire, whereas the other games were not as close where one bad call would have made a difference in changing the outcome of the game.

After reviewing the Knicks-Celtics’ 4th quarter in detail, there were two calls/no-calls that we thought were wrong that helped Boston. There was one no-call for New York that helped them.

At the 11:07 mark, Glen Davis barreled into Jared Jeffries out-of-bounds, which should have been a technical on Big Baby. Referee Bennett Salvatore (#15) was the closest ref who missed the call, although it was so clear what happened, the other refs (Joe Crawford (#17) and Michael Smith (#38)) could have blown the whistle as well.

How Jeffries restrained himself from retaliating was impressive…or maybe wimpy? You can check it out in the video player below the 6:30 entry.

After that, there were two travels by the Knicks’ Carmelo Anthony that weren’t called. He scored on one of them at the 10-minute mark. We won’t even provide a video for it because as we’ve explained in our special report at Refcalls.com/missed-travels, there can be up to 40-50 missed travels per game, and Anthony is a notorious offender who is rarely caught (like most players). However, if a team wins late in a game because of a missed travel, we’ll feature it.

8:48 – There was a questionable blocking foul on Delonte West while guarding Carmelo Anthony. It looked like that Melo might have pushed off, but West got the foul. But since New York lost, it didn’t change the outcome of the game.

6:30 – Rajon Rondo lifts his pivot foot before releasing the ball (and thus travels), spins around his defender, scores, and there’s no call from ref Joe Crawford (#17), the closest ref to the play. Because Boston won this game and it was such a big score as the Celtics were making a comeback to give them an 82-81 lead, we have also featured it in the video below.

2:40 – Paul Pierce bumped Anthony with his body, but there was no call. Fortunately for Anthony, a second later after bouncing off Pierce, he put up a 3-point shot and hit it to give NY a 91-88 lead.

From that point, Boston made plays down the stretch, and New York didn’t. Thankfully after Rondo’s travel and bucket at the 6:30 mark, there was really no other call that had a huge bearing on changing the outcome of the game, which is good since we’ve all seen much worse. But Rondo’s missed travel that helped Boston get the lead has to make Knick fans feel a little sick on Wednesday morning.

  • Olbrannon

    Some are saying KG was out of bounds (arm?) with the ball in his possession at the 13 second mark and got a time out instead of a turnover

    • RefCalls staff

      That’s correct if you’re talking about the one at the 4 second mark. We did the same and KG was never out of bounds.

      • Olbrannon

        What about Celtics leaving the bench?
        Were they off the bench before time was stopped by the official?.

  • phillatio

    i saw a replay under the baske and kg was never out of bounds